Frequently Asked Questions

Applicant FAQ

  1. What is the right-of-way? It is a city owned strip of land from the edge of the street back anywhere from 3-10 ft. If you have a detached sidewalk it’s the strip of land between the edge of the road and your sidewalk.
  2. Why only plant in the right-of-way? Trees planted in the right-of-way offer more benefits for the entire community rather than just the homeowner of the property. Also, we water and take care of the trees. We need public access to the trees to be able to care for them.
  3. Can I pick what kind of tree I get? Yes, you will have a chance to pick from a variety of trees that we know grow well here in Cheyenne. If your property is clear of overhead power lines you must get a shade tree (i.e. Elm, Oak, Linden, Maple). If you have overhead power lines you must get an ornamental tree (i.e. crabapple, hawthorne)
  4. Why can’t I plant a crabapple in my right-of-way if I don’t have overhead lines? Crabapples or other ornamental trees have a wider growth habit than shade trees. They grow out not up, which is why we plant them under powerlines. Having a tree that grows outward is not ideal for a right-of-way because of the need to keep the street and sidewalks clear of branches. This would mean more pruning more often and put undue stress on the tree.
  5. When do I pick and pay for my tree(s)? When all site visits have been completed on every property receiving a tree, we will send out an email with a specific link for you to select and pay for your tree(s). Usually about 1 month before the planting day.
  6. How often do you plant trees? We have two planting days per year. One in spring and one in the fall. We will plant at least 100 trees per planting day.
  7. How long do you care for the trees? We will water your tree and do health check ups for one year from your planting date. After that it is up to you to water and care for your trees. We are always available for questions concerning your tree no matter how long ago it was planted.

Volunteer FAQ

  1. How do I volunteer to plant trees? You can sign up on our website at rootedincheyenne.com/volunteer
  2. How long do I need to volunteer for? We have a morning crew and an afternoon crew. Each crew will plant trees for 3-4 hours. You can volunteer for either morning or afternoon or both.
  3. What should I wear? Wear weather appropriate clothing that you don’t mind getting dirty. Wear close toed shoes. Dress in layers.
  4. What should I bring? The only thing you need to bring is yourself motivated to plant trees. Tools will be provided. We may or may not have gloves depending on if we get donations of gloves.
  5. How do we get to the planting locations? If your crew leader has room, you may ride with them. If not, you will have to provide your own transportation. We recommend car pooling with other volunteers in your group.
  6. How many trees does each crew plant? Each crew will plant approximately 9-12 trees in various locations throughout the city.
  7. How can I help water trees? We are always looking for volunteers to help us with tree watering. You can use your own truck with a water tank or you can use our truck with the water tank. Contact us if you’d like to help.

Other FAQ

  1. Will tree roots get into my water and sewer lines? Water and sewer lines are typically buried a lot deeper than your tree roots will ever go. Tree roots only grow in about the top 1 ft. of soil. Water lines are pressurized and tree roots will not be able to enter them. Tree roots will however grow into your sewer lines if your trees are not watered properly. When a tree is thirsty the roots will do anything to get water, including getting into your sewer lines. If you keep your trees watered and taken care of that should never be a problem.
  2. Its so expensive to take care of trees why should i get one? Yes it may be pricey to have professionals prune or remove your trees (hopefully not for a long time) but the benefits that trees give you far outweigh the cost of caring for a tree over its lifetime. It may be hard to see that because some tree benefits are not tangible. Benefits like cleaning our air and water, reducing stress, reducing crime, and positively affecting our health are priceless. Trees are an investment. You put a little money in and receive a lifetime of benefits.